Aspirational Architecture by Kidosaki

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Aspiration is an interesting subject to explore, especially in the field of architecture. When I saw these magnificent structures by Kidosaki architects in Japan it reminded me of our will as human beings to build homes that are not only necessary to sustain life, but also to represent ambition and future goals. Good architecture encourages fantasy, it links the past (what we hold important and want to remember) with the future. It doesn’t capture a particular state of time, but an imagined future space that we can revolve around.

I’m not an architect myself, but I do feel an affinity with the certain design motions that every architect goes through, many inspiring creatives would class themselves solely as ‘architects’ (even if they do dabble in a number of other fields). Saying that, I don’t feel like you can confine a subject that’s so vast to a small array of elements, but I’ve noted some interesting points over the years and have saved the most important of these in a scrapbook of my own. Maybe I’ll use this documentation and inspiration to build a humble home for myself some day, who knows.

One thing that strikes as most important in a home is the functionality, room placement for example and other essential amenities, all of which are most prominent in residential builds. Another valid point is examining the architecture of the region, taking lessons from its use of materials, colours, and patterns. This will give a sense of place in the build, using elements in the culture that are desirable and minimise those that aren’t. You can see this shine through prominently in the photos of Kidosaki’s architecture here. They’ve used distinct Japanese elements, such as the traditional wood, alongside other materials like concrete and steel to create a new/old balance. There’s a definite sense of aspiration with the grand forms, especially those builds that hang on the side of a hill overlooking the beautiful landscape, as if something designed by Richard Neutra in Southern California. Overall though, I’m admiring the consistency across the portfolio, I’d definitely recommend flicking through to see if any other photos serve as inspiration.

kidosaki.com

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